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  • Episode 4-477 – The Apocalypse – Nick Sansbury Smith
    The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-477 – The Apocalypse – Nick Sansbury Smith  (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4477.mp3] Link MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Chris’ other show à Intro: Hello my friends and welcome to episode 4 477 of the RunRunLive podcast. Here we are a week after the 126th Boston Marathon.  I have no entertaining race report for you.  I didn’t run.  But somehow the race managed to pull itself up and run without me.  In section one I’m going to talk about this year’s Boston Marathon.  In section two I’m going to talk about how to understand and leverage the fear of loss to achieve your goals. And in today’s interview I speak with triathlete and Indy author Nick Sansbury Smith.  It’s a great chat.  I wanted to ask Nick how he manages to be a successful independent author and still manage to stay healthy.  Turns out he works his ass off.  I’m going to keep interviewing people until I find that one who spends 3 hours a day working and is highly successful.  I know they’re out there! I’ve been working myself.  I think that’s the real secret.  To realize you’re going to get up a work everyday until you can’t anymore, but to figure out how to get something out of it – so you’re working on your own terms.  Spring is springing up around here.  Trees are starting to bust out.  My cherry tree and my forsythia bushes are flowering.  My blueberry bushes and raspberries are starting to bud up as well. My chives wintered over from last year.  As a matter of fact the chives have escaped into the woods and gone feral.  They’re out there competing with the poison ivy for world-forest-dominance.  I’m feeling pretty healthy.  I’m back on a clean eating routine.  I am walking Ollie a mile a day in the trails and I’ve got a pretty good fitness routine going that I’ll talk about in the outro.  One advantage of not running a marathon last weekend is that I can start working on my yard without fear of ruining my race!  This weekend I think I’ll turn over the gardens if the weather stays nice.  I’m contemplating spending some, if not all of the summer down on Cape Cod in my other house.  Now that I’ve chased the racoon out.  So I told my wife that she can use my garden beds to plant her cut flowers.  It’s good to give the vegetables a rest every few years.   I do have a fresh crop of hybrid tomatoes for this year.  I got a good germination rate.  14 out of 15 seeds are going strong under the grow lights.  It’s a beautiful thing.  How are you doing?  It looks like the pandemic is winding down.  More like people just stopped worrying about it.  But, did it help you think about your priorities?  Maybe be kinder to yourself?  I wanted to talk with Nick because he is a very successful independent author.  And that’s not easy.  The new world of publishing is a double edge sword.  The internet removed the old gate keepers so now anyone who wants to be a published author can do it.  No one has to give you permission.  The other side of that cutting edge is that this creates a vast, noisy soup of mediocrity the is hard to stand out in.  They freed the authors’ voices and simultaneously commoditized them. And this is true of all artists in this new frame of reference.  Artists are free to create.  They are free and enabled to release their creations out into the world.  From the garage bands to dancers, everyone can take their shot.  But it’s still work.  Especially if you define success as commercial success, which you don’t have to, but if you do, it’s now on you to create that success and differentiate from the throng.  Now we have turned our starving artists into hustlers.  Like I said, It’s a double edged sword.  And you might say that this artistic Darwinism is good for everyone, the cram floats to the top.  And this is true.  But the vast middle stays stuck.  So in many ways nothing has changed.  The gate keepers are gone but the algorithms are still deciding.  I think at the end of the day you need to work in your art because you are compelled to do it.  It’s answering the sirens’ song – a longing within you that you don’t have a choice over.  The art completes you.  The art compels you.  And in this sense there are fewer frustrated artists stuck in back offices and laundry rooms wishing their lives away.  I think it’s a good thing.  I’d say it’s democratic, like the original internet evangelists used to, but I think i’'s more chaotic and less deterministic, which suits me. Anyhow, your assignment for the week is to go buy something from a struggling artist.  And leave a nice review.  Karma is a river and you need to inflate your raft and take it over the falls every once in awhiole. On with the show.   About Zero ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action. Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations) … I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.   … The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  … Section one – Boston 2022 -   Voices of reason – the conversation Nicholas Sansbury Smith – Indy Writers in the Apocalypse Nicholassansburysmith.com  Nicholas Sansbury Smith is the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of the Hell Divers series. His other work includes the Extinction Cycle series, the Trackers series, and the Orbs series. He worked for Iowa Homeland Security and Emergency Management in disaster planning and mitigation before switching careers to focus on his one true passion–writing. When he isn’t writing or daydreaming about the apocalypse, he enjoys running, biking, spending time with his family, and traveling the world. He is an Ironman triathlete and lives in Iowa with his wife, their dogs, and a house full of books.    Section two –Fear of Loss -   Outro Ok my friends we have written our way to the end of episode 4-477 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   I have not been running still.  And the knee feels pretty good.  It’s basically a 1 on a scale of 1-10.  I’ve got a nice cadence going.  I walk the dog a mile every day.  Which takes about 20 minutes but makes him happy.  Ollie is coming up on 3 years old and he’s starting to be a bit more mellow.  He’s still a bit of a velociraptor, but he gives as many hugs as bites now on average.  I ride my bike 3 days a week.  Tuesday and Thursday I go out for a mountain bike ride in the woods.  Sunday I go out for a longer ride that’s a combination of road and trail.  I’m trying to get some time in the seat and build up my fitness before I start pushing.  It’s also still pretty wet in the woods and as much as I don’t mind working, the deep mud holes can be a bit of distraction.  I’m trying to be purposeful and get my balance and strength back before I get too aggressive.  On the off days, Monday, Wednesday, Friday I’m doing a light core workout and a 30 minute yoga for bicyclist that I really like.  Less than an hour all told, but again, consistency is the name of the game.  Baby steps. Next week I’m going to go out to Cincinnati to hang out and do the ½ marathon at the Flying Pig.  I’m not worried about run/walking the 13 miles.  I’ll jut have to be careful not to hurt the knee.  Should be fun.  We’ll record something.  So it’s all good.  We talked about using the fear of loss and a process pact to change behavior.  I’ll add one more method you can use.  We’ve talked about it before.  It’s self-image.  If you end up in a position where your expected self-image is out of synch with your reality it causes you to be unsettled and to take action to get back into alignment with that self-image.  The easy example for me is when I start putting on too much weight.  There’s no avoiding the pants that are snug.  There’s no avoiding the scale.  These are the facts and they run counter to my self-image.  They cause a discordance in me that drives me to start focusing on my diet and mindfully working to re-establish that other, less lumpy, me. Same with my fitness.  It’s good news bad news.  You might say it’s unhealthy to tie up self-worth in your fitness level.  Maybe, but it also causes you to take corrective action when that fitness level is out of synch with my expectations for myself.  Theses are negative examples, although I would argue they result in positive action. There is a positive version of the same phenomenon.  An aspirational version.  The way this works is that you consciously start to associate yourself with a self-image of what you aspire to be.  This is where those affirmations and validations come into play.  You can starte describing yourself as the person you want to be.  If you are powerful enough about this it can create that same motivation to take actions that will put you in synch with the aspirational self-image.  Refer to yourself as “A healthy eater” or a “Fit person” enough and your brain will figure out ways to get you there. Try it.  And I’ll see you out there. MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Rachel -> Coach Jeff ->
    4/26/2022
    51:55
  • Episode 4-476 – MK Lever – Dystopian College Athletics
    The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-476 – MK Lever – Dystopian College Athletics  (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4476.mp3] Link MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Chris’ other show à Intro: Hello my friends and welcome to episode 4 476 of the RunRunLive podcast. Today we have a super interesting talk with MK Lever about her dystopian college athletics novel Surviving the second tier.  It’s a hard book to categorize.  On the one hand it’s a near-future dystopian novel about college sports.  On the other it’s a scholarly critique of the current college sports power dynamic and some of its most destructive aspects.  And then there’s a love story and a rocky-esque championship tension and drama.  Like I said, it’s tough to categorize.  And that makes it hard for a novel because we humans love to label and categorize.  Our brains go all weird and fuzzy if we can’t.  You can see this in every review where they say ‘it’s like X’ or even in startup pitches where they will always say something like ‘it’s the Uber of grocery’.  And that inevitably makes it hard on books and businesses to gain traction.  They have to forge their own paths.  They have to create their own market.  Sometimes it works, because that cross-pollination finds a new unserved and undeveloped market niche.  Sometimes it doesn’t work because it takes a lot of energy to create something totally new.  You have to explain to people what it is before you can sell them something.  There’s an old joke about pioneers typically having short lives. Anyhow… That’s who we talk to today.  In section one I’ll talk about this year’s Boston Marathon because it is next week and for the first time in a couple decades I’m not going to be participating.  I feel like I should say more about that, but I’m, let me just say this, and maybe I’m just having a good day, but I feel like I’ve moved into the 6th stage of grief, which is celebration.  No seriously I was out at Starbucks today and realize I’m wearing a Boston Hat and a NYC jacket and wondering what I’ll say if someone asks me about it, like “Are you running the marathon this year?” and how my usual response for the last year has been to apologize, “No, I hurt me knee.” But, thinking about the stories behind this hat and this jacket, all I can really say right now is “No, not this year, but I did, and how cool is that?” In section two I’m going to talk about garbage.  Because, yeah, garbage. I’ve totally stopped running because my knee was too painful.  It’s been a year or so now so my fitness is at an all time low.  It’s interesting.  I think about that motivational speech where the motivator says “Running is hard.  Being fat and out of shape is hard.  Choose your hard.” And it’s true.  Being unfit is hard. I’ve got some plans to change that and we’ll talk a more in the outro. Going back to the Dystopian novel topic.  What MK is doing here is one of the things I really like about the creative vehicle of fiction generally and science fiction in particular.  Setting stories in the future or on a different planet allows the creator a safe place to play with ideas.  To sketch out alternatives to today.  MK does that.  Think of other novels you may have heard of that do this?  How about HG Wells The Time Machine? It’s really a commentary on the class system.  Or Brave new world by Huxley?  Or 1984 or Animal Farm by Orwell.  Or the Hand Maiden’s Tale.  Dystopian novels aren’t about the future.  They’re about us.  They’re the equivalent of Marley’s Ghost showing us the what ifs of our choices, as people, and as a society. That’s your homework.  Read or listen to a dystopian classic and learn something about yourself.  On with the show.   About Zero ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action. Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations) … I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.   … The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  … Section one – Boston 2022 -   Voices of reason – the conversation MK Lewis – Surviving the Second Tier Former NCAA Division I Athlete's New Dystopian Novel Exposes the Dark Side of College Athletics    Imagine a world where coercion, control, surveillance, and manipulation reign. Where imbalance of power makes exploitation easy and where those at the bottom of the heap sacrifice everything to make a profit for those at the top. M.K. Lever's knockout debut work of fiction, Surviving the Second Tier, weaves these issues and themes throughout a new fictional dystopia to display the real world truths that face athletes in the college athletic system. "I wrote this book to educate readers about the reality of the college sports industry, as someone who has been there before," shares Lever. "Sometimes, facts and statistics don't stick with people and since we are intrinsically wired to follow narratives, I wanted to tell people a story in hopes that the message would resonate in a unique and powerful way. I wanted to give college sports the 1984 treatment and create a narrative that would be impactful and a little unsettling."   "Finally, a novel that both entertains and informs about the college and university paradigm of recruiting, rewarding, retaining and career placement of athletes...A very impressive debut novel by MK Lever, an informed – and experienced – former Division 1 runner - providing an exceptional story and encouragement for students to navigate a changing athletic system." Grady Harp, Amazon Hall of Fame Top 50 Reviewer, 5-stars   M.K. Lever, a former Division 1 athlete and PhD candidate at UT Austin, combines her personal experiences as a student athlete and the weight of her academic research in areas concerning NCAA rhetoric, discourse, and policy to create her stunning and emotionally driven literary debut. Surviving the Second Tier depicts a new day in college athletics in which the old multi-sport model has collapsed and the bare bones, but extremely profitable Amateur Fighting Association has risen in its place. Where students once competed in a multitude of sports on a variety of playing fields, now college athletes have only the AFA ring in which to prove themselves in full-contact, no holds barred fights to the finish.   Undefeated and on her way to a perfect record, Sicily "Sis" Jones pushes her way through injury and intense stress to maintain both her fighting record and her perfect GPA. Financial pressure, family pressure, and a cut-throat coach add to her already driven nature, keeping her right at the edge of breaking and hungry to win. Most of Sis's teammates are in no better place – the AFA taps into the pool of poor, disadvantaged kids and the fame attained in the ring to further the profits wrung from the lives of the athletes. Each member of Sis's team is "fighting scared", battling the personal demons that drive them and having those expertly exploited by their coach to gain maximum control of his fighters. When the AFA pits Sis against one of her own teammates in competition, a violent outcome fractures the fragile bond between teammates, coaches, and the AFA, changing the game in new and unexpected ways. Can Sis and her teammates learn to use their voices, rather than their fists, to fight for change and to survive the second tier?   "A stark view of college athletics in a bleak future where fighting is the main sport, all other sports are gone and an abusive, exploitive, charnel house of multi-division Fight Clubs is all that exists.By stripping out all familiar names or descriptions in a novel focused on the three fighters, M.K. Lever adroitly brings attention to the plight of college athletes and athletics today." Brad Butler, Author, 5-stars   As a graduate student researching NCAA policy and rhetoric, Lever began to describe college athletics as a "dystopia" and soon found that listeners engaged more with the ideas she was sharing. "Surviving the Second Tier is different from other dystopias," explains Lever. "It targets the college sports industry, inviting the reader to spend some time living and experiencing the life of a college athlete rather than just watching them compete or reading about them in the media. I wanted to present the real-world issues that affect college athletes in an engaging and palatable way and give a bigger picture of the issues beyond just economic exploitation, which is where most of the public discourse focuses."   "This is a one of a kind book, an emotionally striking, multifaceted narrative of manipulation and control that is both chilling and revealing. Surviving the Second Tier is a valuable contribution to current conversations around the abuse, control, and exploitation of college athletes. M.K. Lever has given us a knockout work of fiction – college athletics meets the Hunger Games..." Jessica Tofino, Educator and Writer, 5-stars   "I want readers will be drawn into the emotional world of Sis and the other characters and begin to see that the college sports industry isn't as glamorous as it looks from the outside," says Lever. "I want to humanize college athletes, help readers to see them as whole people, rather than just game day statistics or salary totals and educate them about the problems these athletes face."   With its gritty dystopian flavor and emotionally resonant characters, Surviving the Second Tier makes readers take a hard look at the sordid side of college athletics—the personal sacrifices, the politics involved in keeping athletes hungry and ready to compete at the top of their game, and the exploitation of talent and over-the-top drive. M.K. Lever skillfully wraps information, education, and advocacy in a sparse, moving, emotionally enthralling story that will keep readers in its grasps until the last page.    Section two –The garbage Project -   Outro Ok my friends that’s episode 4-476 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   Like I said I’ve been not running at all because my knee is really sore.  But all hope is not lost.  I changed to the ½ marathon at the Flying Pig.  Don’t’ need to hurt myself anymore. I got my mountain bike in for a checkup.  More on that later.  Invested in a good pair of knee pads and a new pair of glasses.  Getting ready for when the weather finally turns.  I’m going to start by just building some base miles and getting used to the bike.  Stay out of the technical stuff.  No sense in beating on myself.  Start working in some yoga and core strength.   I’m also back on the diet.  I had sky-rocketed to over 190 pounds.  Time to give up the beer.  My pants were starting to not fit.  So – back on the workout track and we’ll see if the knee responds well to biking.  If it does, I’ll work up to a longer event at the end of the summer. Update here: Went for a nice long MTB ride this morning.  My plan was just to spin up the rail trail and get 2 hours of saddle time.  But when I got to the end of the rail trail I was only 39 minutes in so I went out into some trails that are there at the terminus.  One way it led to a neighborhood.  But the other way were carefully crafted mountain bike trails with nice hand made signs that gave the trail names, like “Barbwire” and such, because part of the MTB culture around here is to give the trails cute code names.  I took it easy and explored the trails.  They weren’t that technical and I avoided anything that might result in a crash or stress my knee. It was just the right level difficulty for me.  Then I rode back on the rail trail for just about 2 hours of total seat time.  Interestingly I felt a pretty significant energy loss on the way back.  It took me some time to remember – ‘hey – this is what hitting the wall feels like!’  Good ride.  Baby steps. My new role at work is giving me stress and taking up a lot of my headspace.  But I’m working to remind myself that I choose to do it and I don’t have to of I don’t want to.  Here are a couple of nuggets for you to consider from my affirmation collection. I.e. you can repeat these to yourself or print them out and hang them where you can see them during the day.  It’s one of my habits to collect these things.  You never know when you’ll need them. First one is: “No matter what happens, I will handle it.”  That will remind you that you’ve worked through a lot of challenging times in your life and you’ve always made it through.  This time won’t be any different.  No matter what happens, you will handle it. Second one is a counter point to the first.  Sure you can handle it, but should you?  Consider this: Remove yourself from a bad situation instead of waiting for the situation to change. You can always walk away.  You have the power.  You have the aegis.  There’s a nice little Greek loan word you can use to impress your friends.  Aegis.  Didn’t originally mean ‘power’ but that’s the modern usage.  The original meaning is ‘protection’ because it is derived from the name of the shield used by Greek gods.  Anyhow, don’t forget it’s always ok to protect yourself.  You can always remove yourself from a bad situation. But, what do you focus on when things are crazy stressful and expectations are out of whack?  You focus on doing the best job you can do in the time you have on the things that are the most important.  Even if you feel like you’re getting railroaded and set up.  Just focus on doing each thing well.  I forgot who said it.  I think it was one of the Apollo 11 astronauts.  They asked him what his secret to success was.  And he replied that he just focused on doing the best e could do with every thing that came in front of him and didn’t worry about anything else. That’s it.  You can handle it.  If you feel like it’s unhealthy or you’re being treated badly, you can walk away.  If you want to play along just focus on being excellent at the important stuff.  It will all work out. And I’ll see you out there. MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Rachel -> Coach Jeff ->
    4/11/2022
    55:17
  • Episode 4-475 – Kayla – Plant-based Coach
    The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-475 – Kayla – Plant-based Coach  (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4475.mp3] Link MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Chris’ other show à Intro: Hello my friends and welcome to episode 4475 of the RunRunLive podcast. Here we are.  Back at it again. Today we talk with Kayla who is a coach and specializes in a plant-based methodology for her athletes.  We had a good chat  and I think we can always learn from coaches, that’s why I talk o them a lot.  Coaches have the advantage of experience.  Not only their own direct knowledge and experience, but the leverage of the experience of everyone they coach.  Because when you teach, you also learn. It’s been a long couple weeks since we talked.  My new role at work has been weighting me down.  It’s hard to switch gears to being a creative form being mentally engaged at work. Even though, as you’ll hear in today’s show, I haven’t been running at all I still struggle to find time to do everything I’ve signed myself up for.  But we keep moving.  Like the characters in my apocalypse story we find a way to survive.  In section one I’m going to talk about how you can handle getting injured close to a race.  In section two I’m going to talk about writing. I’ll move you into the episode with an interesting, to me, etymological side path.  It has to do with sheep.  I have been doing a lot of reading.  I usually read 2-3 books at a time.  This week I was reading two of these books and came across the same phrase in both of the books in the same day, so I figured I should look it up.  The word was “Woolgathering”.  You may know this as a phrase, but it’s a word.  You don’t, at least I don’t, hear it much in day-to-day usage, and when you do it’s a bit quaint.  It means ‘to be lost in thought.  It came into English in the 1500’s when modern English was being formed.  Here’s how it works.  England at the time was a big wool producer.  They had a lot of sheep.  When the sheep wandered around and rubbed up against things tufts of wool would get stuck.  So woolgathering was the process of sending someone, probably a kid, out to wander about collecting these bits of wool.  Not very profitable use of time.  There are a lot of wool-related phrases.  “Pulling the wool over someone’s eyes” is from the same time period.  It refers to the fact that judges wore wigs made of wool.  When a shyster tired to trick them it was like he was pulling their wig over their eyes so they could see. Or how about form the same time period “Dyed in the wool”? Yeah that’s when you put the die into the raw wool before it’s made into cloth.  It fixes the color better.  So when you’re ‘dyed in the wool’ it means you have fixed something in the beginning. The word ‘wool’ itself goes way back to the original Indo-European root word Hwol.  So there ya go.  A bit of etymological woolgathering. On with the show.   About Zero ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action. Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations) … I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.   … The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  … Section one – Skipped Voices of reason – the conversation Kayla Slater – Plant-based Dietitian Kayla Slater is a plant-based registered dietitian nutrition and running coach from Upstate NY. Kayla has been plant-based for the past five years and running for over 10 years. She has completed numerous 5K’s-half marathons and 4 full marathons. She first become exposed to the plant-based lifestyle in college and will never look back. At first, it was for health and now continues to do it for animals and the environment. Kayla is very passionate about living a whole food plant-based lifestyle while also being active. Kayla has been a Registered Dietitian for the past 5 years working in clinical and community nutrition as well as working with people virtually 1:1. She is a Certified Dietitian Nutrition Coach and holds a Plant Based Nutrition Certificate from E-Cornell as well as a RRCA Certified Run Coach and personal training certification from ACE-Fitness. In 2018, Kayla started her own online business to help plant-based endurance athletes. As a young athlete, she suffered from disordered eating habits then later in life, struggled to fuel and eat enough as a plant-based marathoner. But she knew it was possible as Rich Roll told us how it was possible, and Scott Jurek shared how it even could give you an advantage. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics states that a vegetarian and vegan diet for athletes is possible, but it must be properly planned. Kayla realized that others without a background in nutrition may be struggling even more and have a harder time figuring out how to eat plant based for health or as an ethic vegan and still run or be active. With Kayla’s passion for plant-based nutrition and running, Plant Based Performance Nutrition and Run Coaching, LLC was born. Currently, she provides virtual personalized and group support for recreational and intermediate endurance athletes who want to fuel on plants for their health, the environment, and animals, while gaining the plant-based performance advantage. You can connect with her on Instagram, join her Facebook community, or visit her web site to book a consultation. Social Media Links: All Links: Website: Linkedin: FB: IG: FB Group: Youtube: Tik tok: https://www.tiktok.com/@plantbasedperformancerd?lang=en Apple Podcast:    Section two –Varmint -   Outro Ok my friends that’s episode 4-475 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   I’ve had to stop running completely for a couple weeks.  Even with the run-walk method my knee is just too sore to do it.  It’s hard.  Running fills so many of the holes in my life that it really takes a chunk of me away when I can’t do it.  There’s the physical and physiological part.  Running gives me happiness and health.  It keeps me physically fit and mobile.  It keeps me from gaining weight.  It keeps me from filling that time with other bad habits.  It’s my healthy lifestyle enabler.  So without it I feel like I’m in a constant state of decline into decrepitude.  Not running has psychological impact.  I don’t get that alone time in the trails or on the road with my cerebellum bathed in happy chemicals to think.   This puts me on my back foot psychologically during the day.  I don’t get that badly needed relief valve.  Then there is the loss of community.  I can’t go for a 5-mile run with my buddies.  I can’t have those great conversations we have.  It’s all very isolating.  I have not been back to the doctor for the knee but it feels like the same thing.  This injury manifested over a year ago now as I was doing hill repeats one morning, or afternoon.  I don’t think the hill repeats were the cause.  I think I did something the previous summer because I had been having odd, sharp pains when I kneeled for a few months.  And that’s how it is.  When you get injured you tend to think in terms of time frames.  Muscles take a couple weeks to heal.  Fascia takes weeks to months to heal.  This is something new, some sort of bone thing, which according to my entirely made up timeframe should have been getting better in 9 months or so. That’s when I started the run-walk training to see if I couldn’t use active recovery to build strength actively around the healing.  But, as is sometimes the case, our injuries ignore our time frame rules.  I probably should have stayed off it. So, now I am staying off it.  We’ll see what strategy we can use to stay in shape and get some of the physiological and psychological benefits in different places.  I still plan to go the Cincinnati and hang out with my friends, probably limp through the Flying Pig.  But it’s not what I want.   It’s not what I need.  … When I got to the parking garage at the airport this morning I got a bit turned around and ended up not following the signs that were pointing me up towards the roof.  I hate parking on the roof at the airport.  Your car gets covered with jet fuel scum and if it snows you end up having to clear it by hand.  I didn’t follow the signs.  I turned off into the first floor and there was a parking space right in front of the exit door.  I’m not one of those people who circles parking lots looking for the perfect space.  And I usually follow the signs because they are there for a reason.  But, in some cases not following the signs gives you a better result.  Just like sometimes not following the sings of an injury give you better results.  Other times it does not.  We all make our own way in this world and it’s up to you which signs to pay attention to and which ones not to. Keep the faith and I’ll see you out there. And I’ll see you out there. MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Rachel -> Coach Jeff ->  
    3/28/2022
    49:41
  • Episode 4-474 – Frank Shorter
      The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-474 – Frank Shorter  (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4474.mp3] Link MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Chris’ other show à Intro: Hello my long suffering friends.  How are you?  Well it’s been a busy two weeks since the last time we chatted.  And I truly missed.  I get lonely.  I worry.  Where have you been?  How do we know you’re not dead in a ditch? Today I’m going to mess with the format again.  I managed to write a really funny piece about varmints that I’m going to perform for you, but it came out at 2000 + words so I’m going to push that after the interview, skip section one and use the intro here to talk about our guest. Frank Shorter.  Yes that Frank Shorter.  It was one of those interviews where I was hopelessly overwhelmed by content and just did my best to touch on a couple fun things with him.  But, the rich tapestry of Frank’s life does not fit easily into a 20 minute conversation – so I’m going to fill in some of the blanks here. Frank was born, ironically in Munich Germany, where he would eventually return to win the Gold Medal in the marathon at the 1972 Olympics.  His Father was a physician in the army.  Frank grew up in a troubled home in upstate New York.  He started running to get away from an abusive father.  Running gave him the freedom we all know and love.  To get him away from his father, his mother arranged to have him sent to a prep school in Massachusetts where he was given the space to expand his running talents.  He went on to run at Yale for his undergraduate and won a number of NCAA titles.  He moved on to Gainesville Florida to study for his law degree – all the while training and racing at an elite level.  The thing about Franks journey in the 70’s was that he showed up at all the marathon runner hotspots with all the legends.  He trained with that famous Florida track club with Jeff Galloway and crew.  He was in Oregon with Prefontaine.  Frank taught Steve how to Ski.  Frank was with Steve before he was killed.  Frank won the elite Fukuoka Marathon . He was the #1 ranked marathon runner in the USA for 5 straight years and in the world for 3. He won the gold medal at the Munich Olympics in 1972.  You may not remember 1972, but this was the Olympics where the world learned about terrorism.  A crew of Palestinians broke into athlete’s village and held the Israeli Olympic team hostage, murdering some of them. Frank was sleeping on the balcony and heard the gunshots.  Coming full circle, Frank was right there on Boylston Street in Boston in 2013 when the bombs went off.  He won the silver medal in the 1976 games losing to an unknow East German athlete, who most likely was a drug cheat.  Frank has become instrumental in removing drugs from the Olympics – a battle that still rages. Through all this he trained himself with an uncanny mixture of speedwork and volume.  He managed to stay healthy and race across 100+ mile weeks for a decade.  Frank eventually ended up in Boulder where he was the founder of the iconic Boulder Boulder race.  He’s an amazing athlete, a humble, kind and generous guy and I’m sure I’ll be talking to him again. He even has an IMDB page for his roles in several movies!  Great guy, full life, enjoyed meeting him.  … What’s going on in my world?  I’m still training for the Flying Pig in May.  My knee is still a mess, but I’m enjoying when I can. I try to get Ollie out, but the weather has been horrific and I’m at the point in my life where I see less and less merit in unnecessary misery. Hey – a quick heads up – did you see Steve Runner is podcasting again?  Yeah – Pheddipidations is back from the dead.  And it’s not the angry political Steve.  It’s the old runner Steve.  Give it a resubscribe and listen.  It’s good to hear his rational voice. I did manage to get a couple of great training runs out in the woods.  We got a cold snap right after a heavy snow. With the pandemic traffic in my woods the trail was packed down and hard and great for running.  I got out and it was great.  I remembered some of the joy I used to feel being out alone in the woods with the dog.  The cold, crisp air and the packed trail.  Really good. I’ve been getting beaten up fairly well with my new role at work.  But I’m liking it.  I just focus on blocking the time and doing the work.  I’m at a point in my career where I don’t have to worry about failure and that frees me up to be creative.  Makes the work an ecstasy versus a chore. And that’s the secret, my friends.  Remember the gift. On with the show. About Zero ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action. Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations) … I’ll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don’t have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member’s only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.   … The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  … Section one – Skipped Voices of reason – the conversation Farnk Shorter – Marathon Legend Running career Shorter first achieved distinction by winning the 1969 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) six mile run title during his senior year at Yale. He won his first U.S. national titles in 1970 in the three mile and six mile events. He also was the U.S. national six mile/10,000 meter champion in 1971, 1974, 1975 and 1977.   After graduating from Yale, Shorter chose to pursue a Doctor of Medicine degree at the University of New Mexico. However, he dropped out after six weeks after classes began to impact his training regime. Soon, he moved to Florida to study for a Juris Doctor degree at the University of Florida in Gainesville because of the excellence of the environment and the opportunity to train with Jack Bacheler as members of the Florida Track Club (FTC), founded by Jimmy Carnes, then the head coach of the Florida Gators track and field team.[10] Bacheler was regarded as America's best distance runner, having qualified for the finals of the 5,000-meter race at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics.[11] The FTC's core nucleus of Shorter, Bacheler and Jeff Galloway qualified for the 1972 Olympics and their success made Gainesville the Mecca of distance running on the East Coast in the early 1970s.[12]   Shorter won the U.S. national cross-country championships four times (1970–1973). He was the U.S. Olympic Trials champion in both the 10,000-meter run and the marathon in both 1972 and 1976. He also won both the 10,000-meter run and the marathon at the 1971 Pan American Games. Shorter was a four-time winner of the Fukuoka Marathon (1971–1974), generally recognized as the most prestigious marathon in the world at that time and held on a very fast course. His career best of 2:10:30 was set at that race on December 3, 1972. Several months later, on March 18, 1973, Shorter won the elite Lake Biwa Marathon in 2:12:03. He won the prestigious 7-mile Falmouth Road Race on Cape Cod in 1975 and 1976 and Atlanta's 10-kilometer Peachtree Road Race in 1977.   Shorter achieved his greatest recognition in the marathon, and he is the only American athlete to win two medals in the Olympic marathon.[13] At the Munich Games—which coincidentally is Shorter's place of birth— he finished fifth in the 10,000-meter final, breaking the American record for the event that he had established in his qualifying heat.[8] A few days later, he won the gold medal in the marathon. This ultimate achievement was marred by an impostor, West German student Norbert Sudhaus,[14] who ran into Olympic Stadium ahead of Shorter. Shorter was not bothered by the silence from the crowd who had been duped into thinking that he was running for the silver medal. Shorter was confident that he was going to win the gold medal because he knew that no competing runner had passed him.[15] He received the James E. Sullivan Award afterwards as the top amateur athlete in the United States.[8] At the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, Shorter dropped out of the 10,000 meters in order to concentrate exclusively on the marathon, winning the silver medal in the marathon[8] and finishing behind previously unheralded Waldemar Cierpinski of East Germany.[16] Cierpinski was later implicated as a part of the state-sponsored doping program by East German track and field research files uncovered by Werner Franke at the Stasi headquarters in Leipzig in the late 1990s. There were suspicions about other East German athletes during the Montreal Olympics, including the East German women's swimming team led by Kornelia Ender; the East German women won eleven of the thirteen events.[17]   From 2000 to 2003, Shorter was the chairman of the United States Anti-Doping Agency, a body that he helped to establish.[18]   Shorter was featured as a prominent character, played by Jeremy Sisto, in the 1998 film Without Limits. The film follows the life of Shorter's contemporary, training partner, Olympic teammate and sometime rival, Steve Prefontaine.[18] Shorter was the next to last person to see Prefontaine alive before he died in an automobile accident.   Shorter was inducted into the United States Olympic Hall of Fame in 1984, the USA National Track and Field Hall of Fame in 1989,[8] and the National Distance Running Hall of Fame in 1998.   A long-time resident of Boulder, Colorado, Shorter co-founded the Bolder Boulder in 1979. The annual 10k race is a popular Memorial Day event, which culminates with a tribute to U.S. Armed Forces at Folsom Field at the University of Colorado. A life-size bronze statue of Shorter stands outside the stadium. Section two –Varmint -   Outro Ok my friends that’s episode 4-474 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   I still plan to limp through the Flying Pig marathon but my knee is not responding as I hoped it would.  It is weak, unstable and painful.  Basically, well I want to use a family unfriendly word here, but let’s just say it’s not good. Frank Shorter ran the 1976 Olympic Marathon with a bad knee and came in 2nd.  Oy! I have been having a lot of trouble finding the time and inspiration to write and produce this show.  I know it’s getting stale, and you deserve better than that.  I’m considering ways to make it less of a lift for me.  Maybe break the sections up into individual, shorter shows that I could drop more frequently.  Maybe find a theme.  Or create multiple short shows from the various themes I cover here.  Then you could pick and choose what you wanted to listen to. We’ll see how it goes.  One step at a time. I’m heading down to Dallas tomorrow morning and I just realized it’s time change weekend here.  Meaning I’m going to have to roll out of bed at 3:30 AM body-clock time to start a long week with a nice dose of jetlag.  Heard an interesting comment on a call this week.  We were prepping for a executive meeting with one of our customers.  There were two senior executives from our side.  They were talking about a big deal that needed to close at this customer.  One of the Execs said to the other “You need to make it personal.”  That struck me.  After all the professionalism is sorted out every business transaction is personal.  I’ve always tried to avoid that.  Making business personal. But you can’t.  It’s personal whether you want it to be or not.  But making it personal allows you to leverage empathy – so it’s not necessarily a bad thing.  How about that for a thing to try this week? Make it personal. And I’ll see you out there. And I’ll see you out there. MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Rachel -> Coach Jeff ->  
    3/13/2022
    48:52
  • A whole lot of nuthin...
    Going to skip a week.  Chris,  
    2/28/2022
    13:46

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