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Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

Podcast Nature Podcast
Podcast Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

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  • Amino acid slows nerve damage from diabetes, in mouse study
    00:45 The role of serine in diabetic neuropathyNerve damage is a common complication of diabetes, and can even lead to limb amputation. Thus far, the only way for people to slow its onset is by managing their diet and lifestyle. Now though, research in mice shows how the amino acid serine may be key to this nerve damage, suggesting a potential role for the molecule in future therapeutics.Research article: Handzlik et al.News and Views: Serine deficiency causes complications in diabetes06:47 Research HighlightsDNA from chickens is spreading to their wild relatives, and a hidden magma chamber is revealed beneath an underwater volcano.Research Highlight: Chickens’ DNA is fouling the genomes of their wild relativesResearch Highlight: Underwater volcano near Greece is a sleeping menace09:05 Briefing ChatWe discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time: how the Hubble Telescope is still helping scientists, and the multimillion-dollar trade of paper authorships.Nature News: Why the Hubble telescope is still in the game — even as JWST wowsNature News: Multimillion-dollar trade in paper authorships alarms publishersNature Video: Drowning in seaweed: How to stop invasive SargassumSubscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
    1/25/2023
    19:24
  • Laser 'lightning rod' diverts strikes high in the Alps
    In this episode:00:45 Laser-guided lightningScientists have shown that a specially designed laser can divert the course of lightning strikes in a real-world setting. The team fired the laser into the sky above a communications tower high in the Swiss Alps and altered the course of four strikes. In future they hope that this kind of system could be used to protect large infrastructure, such as airports.Research article: Houard et al.News: This rapid-fire laser diverts lightning strikes09:36 Research HighlightsThe crabs that lean on bacteria to detoxify sulfur from hydrothermal vents, and how a persons’ nasal microbes might exacerbate their hay fever.Research Highlight: Crabs endure a hellish setting — with help from friendsResearch Highlight: Plagued by hay fever? Blame your nasal microbes12:02 Briefing ChatWe discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time: how “hot mixing” has helped ancient Roman concrete stand the test of time, and the first vaccine for honeybees shows promise.Ars Technica: Ancient Roman concrete could self-heal thanks to “hot mixing” with quicklimeNew York Times: U.S.D.A. Approves First Vaccine for HoneybeesNature Video: 3D printing adds a twist with a novel nozzleSubscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
    1/18/2023
    20:28
  • The science stories you missed over the past four weeks
    In this episode of the Nature Podcast, we catch up on some science stories from the holiday period by diving into the Nature Briefing.We’ll hear: how Brazil’s President Lula has started to make good on his pro-environment promises; a new theory for why giant ichthyosaurs congregated in one place; how glass frogs hide their blood; about a new statue honouring Henrietta Lacks; and why T. rex might have cooed like a dove.Nature News: Will Brazil’s President Lula keep his climate promises?Science News: Mysterious ichthyosaur graveyard may have been a breeding groundThe Atlantic: How Glass Frogs Weave the World’s Best Invisibility CloakBBC News: Statue of Henrietta Lacks will replace Robert E LeeBooks & Arts: The woman behind HeLaEditorial: Henrietta Lacks: science must right a historical wrongNews: Wealthy funder pays reparations for use of HeLa cellsBBC Futures: What did dinosaurs sound like?​​​​Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
    1/11/2023
    23:39
  • Science in 2023: what to expect this year
    In this episode, reporter Miryam Naddaf joins us to talk about the big science events to look out for in 2023. We'll hear about vaccines, multiple Moon missions and new therapeutics, to name but a few.News: the science events to look out for in 2023Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
    1/6/2023
    15:18
  • The Nature Podcast’s highlights of 2022
    In this episode:00:53 How virtual meetings can limit creative ideasIn April, we heard how a team investigated whether switching from face-to-face to virtual meetings came at a cost to creativity. They showed that people meeting virtually produced fewer creative ideas than those working face-to-face, and suggest that when it comes to idea generation maybe it’s time to turn the camera off.Nature Podcast: 27 April 2022Research article: Brucks & LevavVideo: Why video calls are bad for brainstorming08:29 How the Black Death got its startThe Black Death is estimated to have caused the deaths of up to 60% of the population of Europe. However, the origin of this wave of disease has remained unclear. In June, we heard from a team who used a combination of techniques to identify a potential starting point in modern-day Kyrgyzstan.Nature Podcast: 15 June 2022Research article: Spyrou et al.15:24 Research HighlightsHippos’ habit of aggressively spraying dung when they hear a stranger, and why being far from humans helps trees live a long life.18:36 Higgs boson turns tenTen years ago, scientists announced that they’d found evidence of the existence of the Higgs boson, a fundamental particle first theorised to exist nearly sixty years earlier. We reminisced about what the discovery meant at the time, and what questions are left to be answered about this mysterious particle.Nature Podcast: 06 July 2022Nature News: Happy birthday, Higgs boson! What we do and don’t know about the particle28:28 The open-science plan to unseat big Pharma and tackle vaccine inequityIn this episode of Coronapod we investigated a radical new collaboration between 15 countries — co-led by the WHO, and modelled on open-science — that aims to create independent vaccine hubs that could supply the global south. This project was supported by the Pulitzer Center.Coronapod: 29 July 2022News Feature: The radical plan for vaccine equity40:10 Missing foot reveals world’s oldest amputationIn September, we heard about the discovery of a skeleton with an amputated foot, dated to 31,000 years ago. The person whose foot was removed survived the procedure, which the researchers behind the find say shows the ‘surgeon’ must have had detailed knowledge of anatomy.Nature Podcast: 07 September 2022Research article: Maloney et al.News and Views: Earliest known surgery was of a child in Borneo 31,000 years ago Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
    12/28/2022
    50:31

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