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Radical Candor

Podcast Radical Candor

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  • Radical Candor S4. Ep. 14: Quiet Quitting Speaks Loudly About Bad Bosses
    On this episode of the Radical Candor Podcast, Kim, Jason and Amy discuss the message quiet quitting is loudly sending to bad bosses and managers of managers.  We know that relationships don’t scale, but culture does. This means that while you can’t have a close relationship with every person who reports to the people who report to you, practicing Radical Candor with the people you manage can impact how they interact with the people they manage and so on.  On the other hand, if toxic stew is flowing from the top and being passed down from executives to managers of managers to individual contributors it should come as no surprise that people in this type of environment are disengaged at work. Radical Candor Podcast Episode at a Glance A recent piece in Harvard Business Review by Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman Quiet Quitting Is About Bad Bosses, Not Bad Employees shares data they gathered on almost 3,000 managers who were rated, by five direct reports on average, on two data points:  Employees’ ratings of their manager’s ability to “balance getting results with a concern for others’ needs.” Employees’ ratings of the extent to which their “work environment is a place where people want to go the extra mile” — what they called “discretionary effort.   Managers who were rated the highest at balancing results with relationships saw 62% of their direct reports as willing to give extra effort, while only 3% were quietly quitting. Whereas the least effective managers had three to four times as many people who fall in the “quiet quitting” category compared to the most effective leaders. They found that: “Quiet quitting is usually less about an employee’s willingness to work harder and more creatively, and more about a manager’s ability to build a relationship with their employees where they are not counting the minutes until quitting time.” On this episode of the Radical Candor Podcast, Kim, Jason and Amy pose a few questions to managers of managers: Are you holding managers accountable for the engagement of their team members? Are you looking at relative engagement scores? Even if engagement scores for your company are lower than average deviations from the mean within your organization matter.   If you have managers reporting to you who are underperforming on team engagement in comparison to their peers, you should be treating this as an urgent situation. Radical Candor Podcast Checklist Get curious about why some people on your team are disengaged. If you have managers reporting to you who are underperforming on team engagement in comparison to their peers, you should be treating this as an urgent situation. Ask yourself whether or not you have truly fostered a culture of Radical Candor. Do your employees feel valued, cared for and appreciated? Are their roles clearly defined? Are there opportunities for them to learn and grow? Do they feel like they can come to you with concerns? If the answer is no, you need to focus on building a culture of trust. Have “speak-truth-to-power” meetings. If you’re a manager of managers, it’s difficult to have visibility into every single thing that’s going on. Speak-truth-to-power meetings are an effective way to get clear information from the people who report to the people you manage. Remember, relationships don’t scale, but culture does. This means that while you can’t have a close relationship with every person who reports to the people who report to you, practicing Radical Candor with the people you manage can impact how they interact with the people they manage and so on. Without a culture of trust, which has been identified as the most important factor in determining engagement, you’ve already failed. Sometimes it’s not you, it’s every authority figure ever. As the boss getting feedback from employees you might often feel like a projection screen for everyone’s unresolved authority issues. When it comes time to give feedback to your boss, it can be helpful to remember that. Take a step back from both roles and try to see everyone you're working with as simply people. When you remove hierarchy from the situation, it all looks and feels much more straightforward.   Radical Candor Podcast Resources Quiet Quitting Is About Bad Bosses, Not Bad Employees Is Quiet Quitting Real? How to Manage Managers 6 Ways to Roll Out Radical Candor Like a Boss 2 Questions To Ask To Avoid Working For A Bad Boss Skip Level Meetings: A Quick Start Guide The Asshole Survival Guide: How to Deal with People Who Treat You Like Dirt: Sutton, Robert I.: 9781328695918 Acceptance: A Memoir Hardcover - Nietfeld, Emi
    9/21/2022
    49:48
  • Radical Candor S4, Ep. 13: Get Sh*t Done Step 7—Create a Culture of Learning Where it's Safe to Fail
    Once your idea has been implemented, you probably think you're done with this whole Get Sh*t Done Wheel thing — but there’s one more step, Learn. On this episode of the Radical Candor Podcast, Kim, Jason and Amy talk about how creating a culture of learning can make it safe for people to fail, help mitigate future mistakes and ensure everyone knows how to repeat success. Sounds simple, right? Not so fast. There are two things that can get in the way of learning. Listen to find out what they are! Radical Candor Podcast Episode At a Glance Kim, Jason and Amy discuss why it’s important to learn from mistakes and successes alike to keep improving. And why denial is actually the more common reaction to imperfect implementation than learning. Let’s face it — no one wants to admit they have an ugly baby, but not admitting it doesn’t mean it’s not true. There are two main barriers to learning: 1. The Pressure to Be Consistent You obviously can’t change course like this lightly, and if you do, you need to be able to explain clearly and convincingly why things have changed. Revisit the listen, clarify, debate, and decide steps with an inner circle. When it was time to persuade the broader team again after you've reached a new conclusion, it is important to take a deep breath and share, patiently and repeatedly, how you got there, and to call out the change in direction explicitly. 2. Burnout Sometimes we’re overwhelmed by our work and personal lives, and these are the moments when it is hardest to learn from our results and to start the whole cycle over again. In 2019 — before the pandemic even began — burnout was officially recognized as a work-related phenomenon by the World Health Organization and characterized by 3 dimensions: feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion; increased mental distance from one’s job, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one's job; and reduced professional efficacy.    Kim says, “The essence of leadership is not getting overwhelmed by circumstances.” How do people walk this line, and how can managers set expectations for their teams to help them avoid burning out? Listen to the episode to learn more! Radical Candor Podcast Checklist Sometimes you have to say whoops-a-daisy. Don’t let the pressure to be consistent keep you from acknowledging when things could have gone better. If you have to change course, you need to be able to explain clearly and convincingly why things have changed. This often means revisiting the listen, clarify, debate, and decide steps of the Get Shit Done Wheel. Make it safe for everyone to fail and create a culture that fosters a positive relationship between learning from failure and self-development. You can only accomplish this if you’ve built a trusting relationship with each person reporting to you, and there can only be real trust when people feel free at work and everyone has a safety net. Show up for yourself. Put the things you need to do for yourself on your calendar, just as you would an important meeting. Don’t blow off those meetings with yourself or let others schedule over them any more than you would a meeting with your boss. Make workflows and learning visible using tools like Kanban boards and by “walking around” the office. If you’re virtual, you can check in using a collaboration tool like Joyous. Quantify the benefits of what you’ve learned. This allows you to celebrate failure along with success and it also destigmatizes failure.    Radical Candor Podcast Resources Radical Candor Podcast: How To Use The Get Sh*t Done Wheel 2 Reasons We Stop Learning In Our Careers | Radical Candor Don’t Be Afraid to Fail Because You Can Learn From It! How Intrinsic Motivation Leads to Enhanced Self-Development and Benevolent Leadership as a Boundary Condition - PMC Burnout may be changing your brain. Here's what to do How to Beat Burnout — Without Quitting Your Job - The New York Times Burn-out an "occupational phenomenon": International Classification of Diseases The Backlash Against Quiet Quitting Is Getting Loud - WSJ 6 Tips for Navigating a Work Martyr Culture The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation, and Growth: Edmondson, Amy C.: 9781119477242
    9/7/2022
    53:50
  • Radical Candor S4 Ep 12: Get Sh*t Done Step 6 — Implement Your Brilliant Idea
    Once everyone is on board with your idea, it’s time for action, which brings us to step 6 of the Get Shit Done Wheel. On this episode of the Radical Candor Podcast, Kim, Jason and Amy discuss the good, the bad and the ugly as it relates to the implementation of that decision you’ve just persuaded everyone to get behind. Listen to learn how to toggle between leading and implementing personally. You can't abandon the first for the second. You have to integrate the two. Radical Candor Podcast Episode At a Glance If you become a conductor, you need to keep playing your instrument. If you become a sales manager, you need to keep going on sales calls yourself. If you manage a team of plumbers, fix some faucets. Of course, you need to spend time listening to people in 1:1s, leading debates, and so on. But you need to learn to toggle between leading and implementing personally. Don’t abandon the first for the second; integrate the two. If you get too far away from the work your team is doing, you won’t understand their ideas well enough to help them clarify, to participate in debates, to know which decisions to push them to make, to teach them to be more persuasive. The GSD wheel will grind to a halt if you don’t understand intimately the “stuff ” your team is trying to get done. As the boss, part of your job is to take a lot of the “collaboration tax” on yourself so that your team can spend more time implementing. The responsibilities you have as a boss take up a tremendous amount of time. One of the hardest things about being a boss is balancing these responsibilities with the work you need to do personally in your area of expertise. There are four things to know about how to get this balance right (see the steps in the tips below). Radical Candor Podcast Checklist Don’t waste your team’s time. Allow space for people to get the work done by limiting low-value interactions and interruptions while also making yourself available to offer coaching and guidance as needed. Keep the dirt under your fingernails. Be a thought partner who thinks of themselves as someone who is alongside their employees listening, advising and helping versus someone who is above them or their work. Block time to implement. Put implementation time on your calendar and treat it as you would any other important meeting or task. Don’t allow people to appropriate your implementation time for something they think is more important. Fight meeting proliferation. Everybody hates the meeting that could have been an email. Before you schedule a meeting, ask yourself if it’s really necessary, and if it is — only include the people who are critical. Perhaps most important, don’t schedule a meeting over someone’s implementation time.     Radical Candor Podcast Resources 4 Ways To Persuade Others You’ve Made The Best Decisions Successfully Implement Your Ideas At Work In 4 Easy Steps Think Time: 6 Ways To Leverage This Untapped Tool If we’re so busy, why isn’t anything getting done? | McKinsey Radical Candor Podcast: Are You A Micro Or Absentee Manager? No Task Left Behind? Examining the Nature of Fragmented Work 3 Ways to Bounce Back After a Work Interruption | Duke Today You can learn more about the implementation-making process discussed on this episode in chapters 4 & 8 of Radical Candor
    8/24/2022
    51:38
  • Radical Candor S4. Ep. 11: Get Sh*t Done Step 5 — Persuade Uncle Scrammy
    On this episode of the Radical Candor Podcast the team explains that once a decision is made, you’ve got to get people on board, which brings us to step 5 of the Get Sh*t Done Wheel — Persuade. While getting others to accept your idea might feel like a foregone conclusion, persuasion isn’t easy, and it’s important to get it right.  What’s more, persuasion at this stage of the GSD Wheel can feel unnecessary and make the decider resentful of people on the team who aren’t fully in agreement. Kim, Jason and Amy discuss why expecting others to implement a decision without being persuaded that it’s the right thing to do is a recipe for terrible results and why it's vital to persuade people (like your friend's Uncle Scrammy) that you've done your homework. Radical Candor Podcast Episode At a Glance The decider has painstakingly gone through the listen, clarify, and debate steps and made a decision. Why doesn’t everyone else get why it’s obvious we should do this — or at least be willing to fall in line? This step of the Get Shit Done Wheel — Persuade — is based on Aristotle’s framework and the team outline 4 steps for the persuader to follow to get everyone’s buy-in. Credibility: Demonstrate expertise and humility when persuading. Logic: Show your work when persuading your team. Emotion: The listener’s emotions, not the speaker’s when trying to persuade. All-hands Meetings: Bring others along.  Radical Candor Podcast Checklist Remember, when persuading others to adopt your decision it’s important to focus on the listener’s emotions, not the speaker’s. While you might have a strong emotional connection to a decision, if you fail to take into account your listener’s emotions, too, you won’t be persuasive. To be perceived as credible you’re going to have authentically demonstrate both expertise and humility. And in order to truly demonstrate humility, you need to be flexible, curious and acknowledge the contributions of others. Show your work! Make sure you demonstrate — in a tangible way — how you came to your decision by showing your work. Hold an all-hands meeting to bring others along. Make sure your meetings include both a presentation and a Q&A.  Radical Candor Podcast Resources Radical Candor Podcast Season 4, Episode 2: Use the GSD Wheel So No One Feels Sad, Bad or Left Out How to Persuade Others You’ve Made the Right Decisions Overcoming the Shadow of Expertise: How Humility and Learning Goal Orientation Help Knowledge Leaders Become More Flexible Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Aristotle Logic, Science, and Dialectic You can learn more about the decision-making process discussed on this episode in chapters 4 & 8 of Radical Candor
    8/3/2022
    1:01:03
  • Radical Candor S4, Ep. 10: Get Shit Done Step 4 — Push Decisions Into the Facts
    On this episode of the Radical Candor Podcast, Kim, Jason and Amy discuss how to make a decision after you've listened, clarified and debated your idea. Step 4 of the Get Shit Done Wheel, decide, is all about pushing the decisions into the facts.  The Radical Candor Podcast team outlines 4 steps to follow when making decisions once you have shoved all ego — especially your own — out of the way. They also talk about the pitfalls of unconscious bias, the perils of skipping steps 1-3 and how to avoid garbage can decision-making. Radical Candor Podcast Episode At a Glance Once you have gone through the listening, clarifying and debating spokes of the Get Shit Done Wheel, you have likely lined up decisions and facts and (hopefully) shoved all ego — especially your own — out of the way. Now is the time, as Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey put it, to “push the decisions into the facts.” Or as Kim says — how to help a team make the best possible decisions — or to “always get it right.” Easier said than done. In a recent McKinsey survey, 61 percent of executives said that at least half the time they spent making decisions, much of it surely spent in meetings, was ineffective. And just 37 percent of respondents said their organizations’ decisions were both high-quality and timely. So, how do you ensure you're making the right decisions in a timely manner? The best bosses often do not decide themselves, but rather create a clear decision-making process that empowers people closest to the facts to make as many decisions as possible. Not only does that result in better decisions, but it also results in better morale. Radical Candor Podcast Checklist When making decisions, you’re not the decider (usually). Remember, kick-ass bosses don’t grab decisions for themselves, but rather create a clear decision-making process that empowers people closest to the facts to make as many decisions as possible rather than fostering a culture of garbage can decision-making. The decider should get facts, not recommendations before making decisions. Be aware and accept that we all bring biases to the table in every decision we make. Create a culture where it’s safe for people to bring “unwelcome” facts to the table. Go spelunking before making decisions. To mitigate bias as much as possible, make sure you’re getting to the source of the facts versus making decisions based on ego-driven or emotional recommendations. Finally, hold a Big Decision Meeting and make sure once the decision is final a careful summary of the meeting is distributed to all relevant parties.    Radical Candor Podcast Resources Radical Candor Podcast Season 4, Episode 2: Use the GSD Wheel So No One Feels Sad, Bad or Left Out 4 Things to Consider When Making Decisions to Get Shit Done In 2022 McKinsey Quarterly: Want a better decision? Plan a better meeting Board of Innovation:16 cognitive biases that can kill your decision making The Decision Lab: Why we tend to rely heavily upon the first piece of information we receive Harvard Business Review: The Hidden Traps of Decision Making Wikipedia: Garbage Can Model A Garbage Can Model of Organization Choice Primer on Decision Making: How Decisions Happen by James G. March You can learn more about the decision-making process discussed on this episode in chapters 4 & 8 of Radical Candor
    7/13/2022
    47:03

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